Bartl

Editor/founder of Cheer the Anthem, season ticket holder in Section 326 and full-time sports writer who lists June 9, 2010, as one of the greatest days of his life. Contact him at jeffrey.bartl@gmail.com.


Posts by Bartl

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Opening Night – TBD

Don’t be alarmed when you turn on the NBC Sports Network tonight at 6 p.m. CST and find Brian Schactman hosting CNBC Sports Biz: Game On!That’s your regularly scheduled programming, thanks to this pissing contest between the NHL and NHLPA.

Rinks in Montreal, Philadelphia, Calgary and Colorado will be empty tonight rather than hosting Opening Night, which is now simply referred to as Lockout: Day 25. The two sides met Wednesday for five hours, and they’re apparently meeting again today. An end to the lockout, though, seems to be nowhere in sight.

From Steve Fehr, special counsel to his brother, Donald:

“I think we’re making progress in a number of the areas that were discussed, which include health and safety, drug testing issues, medical care. They were good discussions. It’s a shame that they are going on in the midst of a lockout when we could be doing it while we’re playing, or we could’ve been doing it a month ago or two months ago.”

Yes, thank you for reminding us how neither side apparently consisting of whining 6-year-olds couldn’t sit down and talk like adults much earlier.

From Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly:

“We had no discussion of the major economic issues or system issues, so that continues to be a disappointment from our perspective.”

This coming from someone representing the owners, who could continue getting their precious revenue by hosting games while negotiating. But no, let’s just shut the whole damn league down. That’ll help you make money, seeing as you’ve already bitched about losing $100 million just from wiping out the preseason.

Two weeks worth of canceled regular-season games begins accumulating tonight, eventually amounting to 82 by Oct. 24. Three previously booked nights at the United Center will now feature an empty arena and five total Blackhawks games will be sucked into the lockout’s black hole.

Tonight is the night the lockout becomes real, and not just some disagreement we thought would’ve been worked out months before it could affect us.

We’re mere days away from more games being wiped off the schedule, and my optimism for a resolution has all but disappeared.

Barnaby

One on One with Former ESPN Analyst and One-Time Blackhawk Matthew Barnaby

I was able to get in touch with former ESPN analyst and Blackhawk Matthew Barnaby, who signed with the ‘Hawks during the dark days prior to the 2004-05 lockout. During his one season with the ‘Hawks he played with youngsters Patrick Sharp, Brent Seabrook and Duncan Keith.

Barnaby addresses his opinions on the current lockout, a possible reason why not everyone has signed to play overseas during the work stoppage and his time spent playing with some current ‘Hawks.

Bartl: You saw three work stoppages during your playing days – a short strike in 1992, the three-month lockout in 1994-95 and The Wipe Out of 2004-05. Viewing this one from the outside, what is it going to take for the NHL and NHLPA to come to an agreement for there to be hockey this season? How long is this going to last, in your opinion?

Barnaby: I was drafted in 1992, so i didn’t pay much attention to it because it didn’t affect me. I was going back to junior. As for 94-95, I got sent to the minors and I can say it was probably a good experience for me to play in the minors, but was certainly happy when it ended to really start my NHL career. I went down to Rochester (AHL affiliate of Buffalo) with a great attitude, played hard. I really didn’t understand much of the economics at that time. In 2004 I know Bob Goodenow didn’t have the pulse of the union. That deal could have been done a lot earlier. It’s too bad because everyone suffered. The differences now really are how much is each side going to get of the $3.3 billion pie. It will take concessions on both sides to get a deal done. I really think this should be the easiest one to do. I say we see hockey in November.

Bartl: What makes this lockout different/similar to the previous stoppages?

Barnaby: The difference of this lockout compared to 2004 is they are fighting over the money. Last one they were battling over different philosophies and a different system. Cap or no cap? That’s a huge philosophical difference. Now it’s about how much of that pie each deserves.

Bartl: There’s been some discussion regarding the public-relations battle being waged between the sides. Does either side have the upper hand at this point, or aren’t there any true winners here?

Barnaby: Both sides try and play to the public to try and get support and force the other side into doing a deal. Negotiations are about leverage. The owners hold the most leverage as they have more money and time. The players have a small window of opportunity to make their money and will never get this money back. Owners know it and also know that negotiations don’t start until checks are lost. In the end there are no winners but I do feel the public is more on the players’ side as opposed to the owners’ in 2004.

Bartl: In the end, which side ends up conceding the most?

Barnaby: The players. They are not going to roll over like we did in ’04. This will be different because they have trust in Fehr and also know what they gave up in ’04. Anything with a salary rollback I don’t think gets a deal done. I think if the revenue sharing is closer to 50-50 then a deal is done. Players are the ones giving back, it’s just how much.

Bartl: What factors do players consider during a lockout in determining whether they play abroad, train back home, etc.?

Barnaby: I had my bags packed in ’04 and ready to go to Sweden. My son Matthew grabbed it as I left for the airport and begged me not to go. That was the end of it. I stayed and waited it out. Trained 5 days a week at the start, then 4, then 3. Then stopped skating once the season was cancelled. If I had to do it over I would have went to Europe because I really felt it hurt my career. I think every player that has the opportunity should take advantage. You aren’t going against your union, but trying to stay in shape and keep that competitive edge.

Bartl: You were with the Blackhawks in 2005-06 following the last lockout and played with a young Brent Seabrook, Duncan Keith and Patrick Sharp. Did you see the potential in those guys? Were you surprised the ‘Hawks made such a quick turnaround from 2006 to making the Western Conference finals in 2009, then winning the Stanley Cup the following year?

Barnaby: No, i wasn’t (surprised). I remember telling Dale Tallon when we got Sharpie, ‘Wow how did you steal this guy?’ Highway robbery for Matt Ellison i believe (no offense Matt) .Dunc and Seabs I knew were going to be stars. I knew we had the foundation for a great team and knew Toews was coming into the fold. I was really upset when I got bought out ¬† because I knew the future was very bright once a few changes were made and they were. Great kids, great city, great fans and a deserved Stanley Cup.

We came back after 1994-95, and again after 2004-05. We'll be back after this one, too.

No Hockey League

We came back after 1994-95, and again after 2004-05. We’ll be back after this one, too.

There’s been a bit of a hiatus on the site as we focused on our personal lives in the offseason. Leave it to us to start writing when the league is locked out.

I simply can’t be angry. I’ve tried, honestly. I tried to raise my voice and attempted to flail my arms around like a 70-year-old Italian woman telling a story. I even clenched my teeth once when I’d finally heard enough of about the yet-to-be-clearly-defined “hockey-related revenue.”

None of it takes. I’m just trying to cover up my sadness and disappointment that the NHL has been taken away from me, from us. My subconscious knows it.

The main problem? I don’t know where to direct my anger, and that simply depresses me. The owners, the players,¬†Donald Fehr, Gary Bettman. They’re all guilty. Every last one of them. How do I pick a side when they’re all arguing over my money? And that’s exactly what they’re arguing over – our money, the almighty dollar.

The money we invested into attending games, buying merchandise and whatever else to help make the fourth of four major sports in America – where 23 of the 30 teams call home and where the last 18 Stanley Cup champs reside – grow by billions of dollars over the course of the last Collective Bargaining Agreement.

We watched the NFL lose a traditional offseason and the NBA cancel a chunk of its campaign over money, and we hoped the NHL would be better than that, recognizing it’s place among the sports food chain and knowing the risk of losing the casual fan that’s on their way to becoming knowledgeable because of growing interest.

We’re already living in a world where “record growth” is equivalent to “the Stanley Cup Final having less viewers than “Swamp People.” Take that as you wish – even though I personally don’t care – but less fans means less money for everyone.

More >

SuterParise

Not Landing Suter, Parise Disappointing, not Discouraging

Stan Bowman took his shot(s) and missed, accomplishing a lot more than it seems most of the fan base thought he would.

The Blackhawks’ GM apparently made strong offers to Ryan Suter and Zach Parise to obtain the services of one or both of the most sought-after free agents of this year’s class, but they eventually chose to start anew with the Minnesota Wild and sign identical 13-year, $98 million contracts.

Suter seemed the logical choice given the ‘Hawks struggles on defense last season, and a pursuit of Parise was something that would’ve intrigued us at best. As it turns out, landing Parise was more likely than getting Suter to don the Indian head.

Such is life in the world of high-priced free agency.

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End of Season Reviews: Dan Carcillo

I don't think knees are supposed to bend that way.

There was a time when Blackhawks fans questioned the signing of Dan Carcillo, fearing his off-the-cuff antics would eventually lead to some potentially damaging incident that validated all the concerns.

After the man appropriately nicknamed CarBomb proved everyone right, Stan Bowman went ahead and re-upped him for two more years, putting fans back in the same worrisome position.

Oh, and he got a raise at that.

Carcillo managed to pack a season’s worth of drama into a mere 28 games – a number cut short by suspensions and a season-ending injury that came while making an illegal hit he’s bound to repeat down the road.

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Blackhawks fire Mike Haviland

A Blackhawks coach is leaving Chicago, but it’s not Joel Quenneville – yet.

The ‘Hawks fired assistant coach Mike Haviland on Tuesday in a surprising move few saw coming. It’s pretty safe to assume the first head on the chopping block would have been Mike Kitchen, given his responsibilities with the horribly bad special teams.

Al Cimaglia wrote recently he heard Haviland had an “unwritten promise” to succeed Coach Q, but that sure doesn’t seem to be the case now. I’m assuming Haviland was just as surprised as we are.

Then again, the Blackhawks needed a fall guy for another disappointing playoff “run,” and rather than Kitchen, Q decided to let go of supposedly his right-hand man.

So, in a matter of months Haviland went from being a finalist for the Winnipeg job to unemployed. Seems like a tough break.

We’ll be back with an update once we hear from those who made the decision.

End of Season Reviews: Patrick Sharp

There’s plenty of discussions regarding the Blackhawks’ financial situation and the money tied up in either under-performing players or long contracts currently on the roster.

But along with Jonathan Toews, some of the Blackhawks’ most wisely spent money is being given to Patrick Sharp – and he proved it once again with another solid season.

The Handsome One underwent an emergency appendectomy in the offseason, welcomed his first child into the world Dec. 10 – then scored the next night against San Jose – missed eight games because of a broken wrist suffered against Detroit on Jan. 8, played through the break the rest of the season, and still finished with a team-leading 33 goals.

He may have had a rough playoff series, but what Blackhawk didn’t?

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End of Season Reviews: Andrew Shaw

With 2012 just five days old and #ShawFacts unborn, the Blackhawks’ fan base sounded like a group of owls, collectively yelling “Who?!” after hearing¬† Andrew Shaw was being called up from Rockford.

The little-known fifth-round draft pick wasn’t expected to be in the Blackhawks’ plans this season or even next season, depending on who you ask. Hell, I challenge most of you to even recall the ‘Hawks drafting him.

But there was Shaw, a 180-pound ball of energy unexpectedly ready to make an impact.

And from his first game, that’s exactly what he did. Shaw provided the grit and tenacity we’d hoped to see from more experienced players while also packing a scoring punch. Sure, there are deficiencies in his game. He has plenty to learn, and that aggressiveness he showed ended up costing him in the playoffs, but Shaw provided a pleasant surprise for the ‘Hawks by getting an early jump on his career.

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Things are Gonna Get Easier

Adrian Aucoin participating in second-round playoff hockey for a team that resides in the desert seems about as likely as him being captain for the Blackhawks. Unfoturnely, both have happened.

Well, maybe they won’t. I don’t know. They’re definitely going to be different, though. Right?

Basically, there are a lot of questions marks for Stan Bowman and the Blackhawks’ roster in the offseason, and with hockey still being played in places like Hollywood, the desert and whatever the hell you want to call New Jersey, attempting to make sense of it all seems futile.

What we will do, however, is discuss the good and the bad among last season’s contributors and disappointments who donned the Indian head on a player-by-player basis.

Each week we’ll bring you five player reviews and maybe some random discussion. Here’s what you can look forward to for the first week, as myself, Jim, Tim and JMH breakdown your 2011-12 Blackhawks – who will be playing as much playoff hockey as I will the rest of this season.

Monday — Duncan Keith

Tuesday — Jamal Mayers

Wednesday — Bryan Bickell

Thursday — Andrew Shaw

Friday — Patrick Sharp
We’re going to try and mix in stars and role players each week, with these recaps taking you through the Stanley Cup finals. And if St. Louis ends up playing for the Cup, you’ll likely need your hockey fix since you won’t be watching those assholes.

So, even though the Blackhawks’ season is over, ours isn’t quite yet. Keep checking back.

Raffi Torres nailed with 25-game Suspension for Hit on Marian Hossa

Video of The Shanahammer laying the smackdown above

And the verdict is in. Brendan Shanahan has leveled Raffi Torres with an astounding 25-game suspension for his hit on Marian Hossa in Game 3.

Most of us thought 10. I sure as hell thought it would be 10. But 25? I guess that’s what happens when you’re a repeat offender and deliberately concuss someone in the playoffs.

It won’t bring Hossa back when the ‘Hawks desperately could use him down 3-1 to Phoenix, but at least Torres will serve his time.

Torres’ suspension in the longest since New York Islanders forward Chris Simon was suspended for 30 games in December 2007 for stomping on the ankle of Jarrko Ruutu.

Pretty amazing this hit warrants a 25-game suspension from Shanahan but not even a two-minute penalty from four apparently blind referees/linesmen.