I was able to get in touch with former ESPN analyst and Blackhawk Matthew Barnaby, who signed with the ‘Hawks during the dark days prior to the 2004-05 lockout. During his one season with the ‘Hawks he played with youngsters Patrick Sharp, Brent Seabrook and Duncan Keith.

Barnaby addresses his opinions on the current lockout, a possible reason why not everyone has signed to play overseas during the work stoppage and his time spent playing with some current ‘Hawks.

Bartl: You saw three work stoppages during your playing days – a short strike in 1992, the three-month lockout in 1994-95 and The Wipe Out of 2004-05. Viewing this one from the outside, what is it going to take for the NHL and NHLPA to come to an agreement for there to be hockey this season? How long is this going to last, in your opinion?

Barnaby: I was drafted in 1992, so i didn’t pay much attention to it because it didn’t affect me. I was going back to junior. As for 94-95, I got sent to the minors and I can say it was probably a good experience for me to play in the minors, but was certainly happy when it ended to really start my NHL career. I went down to Rochester (AHL affiliate of Buffalo) with a great attitude, played hard. I really didn’t understand much of the economics at that time. In 2004 I know Bob Goodenow didn’t have the pulse of the union. That deal could have been done a lot earlier. It’s too bad because everyone suffered. The differences now really are how much is each side going to get of the $3.3 billion pie. It will take concessions on both sides to get a deal done. I really think this should be the easiest one to do. I say we see hockey in November.

Bartl: What makes this lockout different/similar to the previous stoppages?

Barnaby: The difference of this lockout compared to 2004 is they are fighting over the money. Last one they were battling over different philosophies and a different system. Cap or no cap? That’s a huge philosophical difference. Now it’s about how much of that pie each deserves.

Bartl: There’s been some discussion regarding the public-relations battle being waged between the sides. Does either side have the upper hand at this point, or aren’t there any true winners here?

Barnaby: Both sides try and play to the public to try and get support and force the other side into doing a deal. Negotiations are about leverage. The owners hold the most leverage as they have more money and time. The players have a small window of opportunity to make their money and will never get this money back. Owners know it and also know that negotiations don’t start until checks are lost. In the end there are no winners but I do feel the public is more on the players’ side as opposed to the owners’ in 2004.

Bartl: In the end, which side ends up conceding the most?

Barnaby: The players. They are not going to roll over like we did in ’04. This will be different because they have trust in Fehr and also know what they gave up in ’04. Anything with a salary rollback I don’t think gets a deal done. I think if the revenue sharing is closer to 50-50 then a deal is done. Players are the ones giving back, it’s just how much.

Bartl: What factors do players consider during a lockout in determining whether they play abroad, train back home, etc.?

Barnaby: I had my bags packed in ’04 and ready to go to Sweden. My son Matthew grabbed it as I left for the airport and begged me not to go. That was the end of it. I stayed and waited it out. Trained 5 days a week at the start, then 4, then 3. Then stopped skating once the season was cancelled. If I had to do it over I would have went to Europe because I really felt it hurt my career. I think every player that has the opportunity should take advantage. You aren’t going against your union, but trying to stay in shape and keep that competitive edge.

Bartl: You were with the Blackhawks in 2005-06 following the last lockout and played with a young Brent Seabrook, Duncan Keith and Patrick Sharp. Did you see the potential in those guys? Were you surprised the ‘Hawks made such a quick turnaround from 2006 to making the Western Conference finals in 2009, then winning the Stanley Cup the following year?

Barnaby: No, i wasn’t (surprised). I remember telling Dale Tallon when we got Sharpie, ‘Wow how did you steal this guy?’ Highway robbery for Matt Ellison i believe (no offense Matt) .Dunc and Seabs I knew were going to be stars. I knew we had the foundation for a great team and knew Toews was coming into the fold. I was really upset when I got bought out   because I knew the future was very bright once a few changes were made and they were. Great kids, great city, great fans and a deserved Stanley Cup.